Hardware Left Behind In Vietnam


Fuel tanks jettisoned by U.S. fighter jets

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Tactical jet planes heavily rely on the JP-4 fuel loaded on the external fuel tanks. However, the auxiliary fuel tanks represent an additional weight, additional drag, and they will reduce the aircraft maneuverability.

In real combat, external fuel tanks are jettisoned when empty or as soon as the aircraft needs to get rid of them to accelerate and maneuver against an enemy fighter plane or to evade a surface to air missile.

Several thousand drop tanks were jettisoned over Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War.

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And here you can see what happened to some of those that were recovered.

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2013 in review


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 51,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 19 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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The Bienemans


Devoted to Honoring Veterans

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Pat and Carol Bieneman

Rebecca and I attended the Charlie Troop 1/9th Blues reunion held at St George Island, FL. in October. It was my first reunion since returning from Vietnam 43 years ago.

The three day event hosted by Pat and Carol was filled with fun, laughter and tears. They started planning the event at least one year in advance and what a great job they did…

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Bieneman CP on Apalachicola Bay for the event-PERFECT!

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Pat & Carol’s wheels

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Back porch where many memories were shared.

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Apalachicola Bay

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Famous Island Landmark

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Many of the reunion attendees stayed here.

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Charlie Troopers attending the reunion

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Charlie Troop Blues 1965-70

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The wives attendance speaks for itself.

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Pete Guthrie (Blue) Jerry Duckworth (Blue India) 1968

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Pete Guthrie (Blue) Pat Bieneman (Blue India) 1968-69

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Rob Struck (Blue India) Mike LaChance (Blue) 1970

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PRC-25 Radio

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Pete Guthrie, Don Coshey, Jerry Duckworth

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Claude Singletary, Crae Carpenter, Phil Merritt, Pete Guthrie

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Gordon Jones, Gene Smith

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Claude Singletary, Pete Guthrie

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Jerry Duckworth and Phil Merritt sharing memories

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Walt “Titch” Titchenell, Don Coshey, Crae Carpenter

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Carol Bieneman, Jerry Duckworth, Pat Bieneman

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Pat updating his blog and posting reunion photos on Facebook. Sitting next to Pat is Wallace “Tich” Tichenell, Spc5 Red CE Gunner1965-66

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Indoor activity

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1st Squadron 9th Cavalry Landing on the Beach at Qui Nho , Souh Vietnam September 13th 1965

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Outdoor activity

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Final adjustments

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Titch scouting the waters

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If the decibel level on the porch friday night was any indication of a good time, I’d say the women had a “GREAT TIME!”

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Walt “Titch” and Mary Alice Titchenell at the Saturday night Buffet Dinner outside at Harry A’s

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Larry Banks (Delta Troop) displaying his pins

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Pat reading the names of the Killed In Action from October 1970 to April 1971

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KIA Table

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Three Soldiers Monument – Apalachicola, Florida

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Visit Pat Bieneman’s blog for more photos of this event.

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Icing on the Cake!

I sat next to 2010 Hall of Fame inductee, Andre Dawson “The Hawk” Chicago Cubs, 1987-92. We talked baseball on our flight from Tallahassee to Miami.

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State Veterans Bonuses


Rebates to Veterans

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It dawned on me the other day that I received a check from The State of Iowa in the Seventies for my 13 month tour in Vietnam. I was a resident of Iowa when I entered the service in 1969. I thought it was around $300, but it must have been $227.50 based on the information below.

Iowa offers a Vietnam Conflict Veterans Bonus for Vets that serveded at least 120 days between July 1, 1973, and May 31, 1975.
Payment of $17.50 per month for service in the Vietnam service area.
Payment of $12.50 per month for service outside of the Vietnam service area.
Maximum payment of $500.

Iowa residents who served on active duty for at least 120 days between July 1, 1973 and May 31, 1975 are eligible for this bonus program. Veterans who served in Vietnam will receive $17.50 for each month served. Veterans that served outside of Vietnam during this time will receive $12.50 for each month of service. The maximum bonus amount is $500 for veterans who served in Vietnam and $300 for those who were not in country.

Quite a few states are giving some sort of rebate to veterans. In nearly all cases, the service member must have been a resident of the state when they entered the service, and be a resident of the state at the time of application.

Read more: http://paycheck-chronicles.military.com/2010/09/09/state-veterans-bonuses/#ixzz2bnvyUD8T
The Paycheck Chronicles

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Article 15


So much for receiving a good conduct medal

Forty-three years ago today there was a party in our hooch which lasted into the wee hours of the night. After all, how often does a guy turn 21, and in Vietnam no less? I didn’t report for perimeter guard duty that night and it cost me an Article 15. For certain minor offenses, the military offers non judicial punishment – also known as NJP, Article 15.

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PBR time in my AO…
Dave Roger, Tom Connell & Rob Struck

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Charlie Troop Blues relaxing with a cold one after a hot day in the bush.
Mike Melton, Jim Debolt, Bob Porter, George Burns, Dave Parkhurst & Dave Roger

I don’t recall what my fine was, probable just a token amount of one months pay, if that. The bulk of my pay was sent home because Uncle Sam provided just about everything we needed. I remember paying $2.00 for a carton of KOOL Filters at the Phuoc Vinh PX. That’s right $2.00, which is a good indication of how cheap thing were back then. Upon landing in Vietnam, I was promoted to PFC (E-3-Private First Class). As an E-3 I drew approximately $65.00 overseas pay, $30.00 combat pay and with my basic rank pay of $200.00, my total pay came out to about $300.00 per month…

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Rolling Thunder


The sound of bombs landing in a small area delivered by B52s

VIETNAM WAR BOMB CRATERS

As our choppers headed toward Saigon, I looked down and could see many craters in the terrain caused by bombs dropped over the course of the war. Quite often the Blues were inserted to assess the damage and detonate unexploded bombs inflicted by B-52 strikes.

Our mission in Saigon was for Charlie Troop 1/9th to recon the outskirts of the city in preparation for an upcoming visit by V.P. Agnew scheduled for August 27th, 1970.

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The 52s had three nick names:
*Whispering Death. So called by the NVA because the altitude from which the B52s released their bombs meant you got no warning of their presence. When the bombs arrived was the first sign. Luckily for them bombs do little damage in a jungle.
*Rolling Thunder. From the sound of 318 bombs landing in a small area in a carpet bombing mode with only 3 planes. Rarely did the Yanks use only 3 planes. In 3 years they dropped 860,000 TONS of bombs. 52,000 North Vietnamese died as a result.
*BUFFS. The troops called them this from “Big Ugly Fat Fuckers” or in the presence of the Vicar or ladies, “Big Ugly Fat Fellows”

Their normal bomb load was 84 bombs internally and 24 bombs under the wings. Each bomb weighed 500 pounds. Sometimes they carried 750 lb bombs.

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This photo was taken by Bert Schreibstein at Fire Support Base Buttons in January, 1970. A B-52 air strike (Arc Light) can be seen miles away.

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B-52 bomb craters full of water

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Hooch Maids


Did various chores for GIs

Hooch maids were paid by the GIs on a monthly basis to do a number of chores. These included doing laundry, making beds, sewing patches on uniforms, cleaning hooches (our sleeping quarters) and a number of odds and ends. The maids could earn as much as a captain in the South Vietnamese Army, although it was often less. Most were paid was about $10.00 per month.

The military generally allowed most officers and non-commissioned men to have hooch maids, whenever these men wanted and requested their services. Some maids reportedly had sex with soldiers to earn extra income…
 
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Photo courtesy of Dennis Junger

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Photo courtesy of Dennis Junger

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Photo courtesy of Richard Lamb

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Photo courtesy of Chris Bussells

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Hooch maid in front Blues hooch

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Phuoc Vinh village

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Working girl of Phuoc Vinh
Photo courtesy of Dennis Junger

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‘Asian Girls gone Wild’
Photo courtesy of Dennis Junger

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